Humans are so cruel at times. They make it their mission to make other people’s lives miserable by enforcing their view as to how they should conduct their lives, even though it gives them nothing.

Seems like everyone is a critic these days. No matter how much of a shit storm their own life may be, surprisingly, they still find enough time to ridicule, criticize and cyber bully others. But the leading contributors of hate on social media platforms are the SJWs or the ‘social justice warriors’.

Another dilemma clawing its way into the hearts of many self-conscious teenagers is that of body shaming. Body Shaming is defined as inappropriate negative statements and attitude towards another person’s weight or size, according to bodyshaming.org

“First I’m too fat and now I’m too skinny,” tweeted an angry Khloe Kardashian, who apparently busted her ass and lost a good 40 pounds through sheer hard work and determination, only to be titled “skinny” by her online critics. Just comes to show that we live in a world filled with hate, jealousy and people who are never satisfied, no matter what.

But now the SJW’s have successfully cornered another victim by the name of Ashley Graham. Ashley Graham is a plus size model who has shattered the norms of society as to how a model should look like. After posing in a hot white skirt and leather Balmain jacket, Ashley was surprised to see a wave of negative comments as she writes in an essay for the Lenny Letter newsletter, “According to the comments, some people were upset because I appeared to be slimmer.” Just to sum things up she argued in her essay that “To some I’m too curvy. To others I’m too tall, too busty, too loud, and, now, too small — too much, but at the same time not enough.”

On some level, all of us suffer from a mental disorder, namely body dysmorphia, which is basically a negative body image. Unfortunately, the side effects of being body shamed may include a drastic increase in body dysmorphia, depression and poor health, according to a study published by the Journal of Behavioral Medicine.